‘As We Climb’

Video

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“Lifting As We Climb” has long been the mission of African-American women. The sentiment, dating back to the first clubs founded by black women who fought for women’s suffrage and equality, is evidence that there has always been a bigger picture in mind.

To celebrate Black History Month and to commemorate the centennial of the 19th amendment ratification, Madamenoire partnered with Ancestry to create As We Climb, a celebration of trailblazing African American women who helped shape history. From bringing their families through the atrocities of slavery to mobilizing communities to fight for their rights, we highlight the determination, beliefs and hopes of past generations through an exploration of the lineages of three inspiring African-American women.

In As We Climb we follow Cathy Hughes, founder and chairperson of the largest African-American owned media company, Urban One; Eunique Jones Gibson, founder of Because of Them We Can, a platform dedicated to promoting black excellence and Brooklin Hardiman; a passionate student and voting activist at Howard University (HBCU), as they discover the histories of remarkable women in their bloodlines who laid the groundwork for generations to come. From the not-so-simple act of making sure their children could read to bravely speaking out on the injustice of slavery, we’re introduced to their ancestors who lived by the mantra “if I can’t, they will.” As each woman explores new branches in her family tree, we find that commitment to civic action and making change for the better are the through-line that binds them.

3 Black History Makers You Should Know

Black history is celebrated on a regular basis, but the month of February is specifically dedicated to embracing and uplifting Black culture, as well as historical and present-day monumental figures. These revered individuals have had a hand in molding their successors, allowing for them to seamlessly follow in their footsteps as the blueprint was already provided. Some of the Black history makers who have paved the way for generations to come are Maya Angelou, James Baldwin and Madam C.J. Walker.

Maya Angelou was not only a famed poet, but she was also a fervent civil rights activist and wrote an award-winning memoir in 1969, “I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings,” which was comprised of numerous poems and essays. Angelou’s acclaimed memoir was the first nonfiction bestseller by a Black woman. Angelou’s collection of poetry also includes “And Still I Rise,” which featured “Phenomenal Woman,” “I Shall Not Be Moved,” and a host of others. Maya Angelou won a number of awards, but her legacy extends far beyond her literary feats, as her impact will continue to transcend and shape generations to come.

Novelist James Baldwin fearlessly wrote about race, sexuality and humanity during a time when Black voices were being suppressed. Most famous for his novel, “Go Tell It on the Mountain,” Baldwin also penned groundbreaking essays such as “Notes of a Native Son” and “The Fire Next Time.” The Harlem-born writer took literary risks, addressing social issues, allowing for writers who came after him to be valiant when sharing their thoughts on paper for the world to see.

Entrepreneur and self-made millionaire Madam C.J. Walker changed the trajectory of Black hair care, inventing products for Black women suffering from hair loss. Though she was born a slave, Walker had a larger vision for herself. After developing a scalp disorder causing her to lose a large portion of her hair, Walker began using home remedies and store-bought hair care products in hopes of reversing or improving the condition of her hair. After perfecting her formula, she opened a factory in 1908, as well as a beauty school in Pittsburgh. Two years later, in 1910, Walker shifted her business to Indianapolis where she amassed major success, making profits equivalent to several millions of dollars.

Maya Angelou, James Baldwin and Madam C.J. Walker are three Black history makers that you should know.

SEE ALSO

The Evolution Of Teaching Black History To American Students

Understated Ways African Americans Can Make Black History

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HBCU Spotlight: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

On October 3, 1887, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, aka FAMU, was founded as the State Normal College for Colored Students and began classes with fifteen students and two instructors. Today, FAMU, as it has become affectionately known, is the premiere school among historically black colleges and universities.  Prominently located on the highest hill in Florida’s capital city of Tallahassee, Florida A&M University remains the only historically black university in the eleven member State University System of Florida. The university also has several satellite campuses including a site in Orlando where the College of Law is located and sites in Miami, Jacksonville and Tampa for its pharmacy program.

Mission Statement:

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU) is an 1890 land-grant institution dedicated to the advancement of knowledge, resolution of complex issues and the empowerment of citizens and communities.  The University provides a student-centered environment consistent with its core values.  The faculty is committed to educating students at the undergraduate, graduate, doctoral and professional levels, preparing graduates to apply their knowledge, critical thinking skills and creativity in their service to society.  FAMU’s distinction as a doctoral/research institution will continue to provide mechanisms to address emerging issues through local and global partnerships.  Expanding upon the University’s land-grant status, it will enhance the lives of constituents through innovative research, engaging cooperative extension, and public service.  While the University continues its historic mission of educating African Americans, FAMU embraces persons of all races, ethnic origins and nationalities as life-long members of the university community.

Notable Alumni: Sportscaster, Pam Oliver; American tennis player and professional golfer, and the first black athlete to cross the color line of international tennis, Althea Gibson; recording artist, actor, poet and film producer, Common; Singer and Songwriter, K. Michelle; Movie Producer, Will Packer and Pro Football Hall of Famer and Olympic sprinter, Bob Hayes

Mascot: The Rattler

Enrollment: 11,000 students

 

learn more: http://famu.edu/

HBCU Spotlight: Delaware State University

(edit) Delaware State University

The Delaware College for Colored Students was established on May 15, 1891, by the Delaware General Assembly under the provisions of the Morrill Act of 1890. The school’s Board of Trustees used part of the initial $8,000 state appropriation to purchase a 95-acre property north of the state capital of Dover to establish the new college. Because there was already a private Delaware College (now the University of Delaware) located in Newark, Del., to avoid confusion new state legislation was passed and enacted in early 1893 to change the black school’s name to the State College for Colored Students. From then the College was launched upon its mission of education and public service on February 2, 1892. The College graduated its first class of degree candidates in May 1898. The normal course of study (teacher education) was extended to four years in 1911 and the Bachelor of Pedagogy degree was awarded. The College graduated its first class of bachelor-degree candidates in June 1934. In 1944, the College received provisional accreditation by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE). In 1947, the name of the institution was changed to “Delaware State College” by legislative action. On July 1, 1993, Delaware State College turned another chapter in its history when Gov. Thomas Carper signed a name change into law, thus renaming the College to Delaware State University. Since 1957, the University has grown in stature as a center for teaching, research and public service. The purpose of the University has broadened in keeping with changing times. While recognizing its heritage, the University is among the top premier Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) in the country, while serving a diverse student population. 

Mission Statement:

Delaware State University is a public, comprehensive, 1890 land-grant institution that offers access and opportunity to diverse populations from Delaware, the nation and the world. Building on its heritage as a historically black college, the University purposefully integrates the highest standards of excellence in teaching, research and service in its baccalaureate, master’s and doctoral programs. Its commitment to advance science, technology, liberal arts and the professions produces capable and productive leaders who contribute to the sustainability and economic development of the global community. 

Notable Alumni: Clifford “Brownie” Brown- Jazz Trumpeter, John Taylor- former NFL player, Emanual Davis– former NBA player; Jamila Mustafa- Media Correspondent

Mascot: Hornets

Enrollment: 4,872 students

learn more: https://www.desu.edu/

They Came Before Tiger Woods: James “Jimmy” Garvin

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For Black History Month, WOL News Talk 1450 AM, WYCB My Spirit 1340 and Praise 104.1 will be taking a look at golfers who came before Tiger Woods and the struggles to play the game in a segregated society. Today we talk to James “Jimmy” Garvin, Golf Course Owner & Hall of Famer.

Garvin is Jimmy Garvin Legacy Foundation. The foundation travels all across the world to prepare kids for the challenge of golf and the challenge of life. Garvin’s passion for Golf is evident and works to push the African-American Golf culture is spotlighted in this episode.

RELATED: They Came Before Tiger Woods: Wake-Robin Golf Club, Inc

RELATED: They Came Before Tiger Woods: David Ross, Royal Golf Club

RELATED: They Came Before Tiger Woods: Mel Blackwell

Black History Month HBCU Athlete Spotlight: Steve “Air” McNair [Video]

FBN-SUPER BOWL-MCNAIR TACKLED

Source: TONY RANZE / Getty


For Black History Month, we will spotlight some of the greatest athletes in Historically Black College and University History. Today we honor the man known as “Air” McNair.

Steve McNair was born on Valentine’s Day in 1973. The Mississippi-Native began starred as a four-sport athlete at Mount Olive High School, playing football, baseball, basketball, and track. McNair was good enough to be drafted by the Seattle Mariners in the 35th round of the 1991 Major League Baseball Amateur Draft. McNair was pursued by the University of Florida but like a lot of Black High School Quarterbacks, he was offered a scholarship to play another position. Wanting to stay at his desired position of QB, McNair decided to play football for the Braves of Alcorn State University in rural Lorman, Mississippi.

In his senior season, McNair gained 6,281 combined yards rushing (904) and passing (5,377), along with 56 touchdowns. McNair took home the Walter Payton Award as the NCAA Divison 1-AA’s best player and finished 3rd in the Heisman Trophy voting. Many believe that if McNair was at a bigger school with his senior numbers he would have taken home College Football’s most coveted award. He left Alcorn State with 16,823 career yards, an NCAA Football Championship Series (Formerly known as the NCAA Division 1-AA) record to this day.

In 1995, the Houston Oilers were searching for a new quarterback. The Oilers was once home to another Black Quarterback, Warren Moon, who with his combined yards total in the NFL and Canadian Football League, was the all-time leader in passing yards. Moon was traded to the Minnesota Vikings after the 1993 season and struggled to find his replacement until new Head Coach Jeff Fisher drafted McNair with the third pick in the 1995 NFL Draft. At the time, McNair became the highest-drafted African-American quarterback in NFL history. While he played some spot duty, Steve officially became the starter in 1996, the team’s first season in Tennessee and the state where he would become a legend.

After back to back 8-8 seasons in 1997 and 1999, the Titans set the NFL on fire, posting a 13-3 record and a Super Bowl berth versus the St. Louis Rams. In the games final seconds, McNair threw a pass to wide receiver Kevin Dyson which came up a yard short of the winning touchdown. McNair continued to improve as a passer and in 2003, McNair made history becoming the first Black quarterback to win the NFL’s Most Valuable Player award, sharing honors with Indianapolis Colts QB Peyton Manning. McNair finished the 2003 season as the league leader in passer rating and became the youngest player in NFL history to pass for 20,000 yards and run for 3,000 yards.

McNair finished the last two seasons of his career with the Baltimore Ravens. His career achievements include:

  • 3× Pro Bowl (2000, 2003, 2005)
  • Second-team All-Pro (2003)
  • NFL Most Valuable Player (2003)
  • NFL passer rating leader (2003)
  • Heisman Trophy finalist (1994)
  • Walter Payton Award (1994)
  • Titans/Oilers Ring of Honor
  • Tennessee Titans No. 9 retired

The world unfortunately lost McNair in July of 2009, but his legacy on the field and for future HBCU athletes lives on.

RELATED: Black History Month HBCU Athlete Spotlight: Earl “The Pearl” Monroe [Video]

RELATED: Black History Month HBCU Athlete Spotlight: Doug Williams [Video]

RELATED: Black History Month HBCU Athlete Spotlight: Walter Payton

Preserving Black History: Martin Luther King National Park Gets Major Donation To Protect The Environment

ecoATM Celebrates Black History Month with $10,000 Donation to Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Park

Source: Parker Owens for NewsOne / Parker Owens for NewsOne


Martin Luther King Jr.’s rich legacy is commemorated in many ways, but the civil rights icon and his impact on American history often circle back to his efforts in creating a more just and equal society. That is part of the reason that Martin Luther King Jr. National Park was created in Atlanta nearly 30 years ago as a way to pay homage to him and to give back to the community where he was raised.

On Thursday, however, the park was the one on the receiving end thanks to a sizable donation. 

ecoATM, a reCommerce company for consumer electronics that encourages economic and financial flexibility by planting kiosks in various locations where people can exchange their old phones for money, presented Martin Luther King Jr. National Park with a check for $10,000 to help fund an existing initiative that seeks to educate young people about the importance of recycling — especially at the park itself.

”We were right in the midst of our discussion on how we were going to enhance our recycling program,” Judy Forte, who serves as the superintendent for the park said during the ceremony in the northeast section of Georgia’s capital city. ”We will be working with our local partners on how to connect with them to even do more.”

ecoATM Celebrates Black History Month with $10,000 Donation to Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Park

Pictured from left: Judy Forte, Superintendent of Martin Luther King Jr. National Park and Tony Rome, marketing strategist for ecoATM | Source: Parker Owens for NewsOne


The park lays in the center of what used to be the fourth ward of Atlanta and is of great importance to the community. It not only serves as a beacon for communal comradery but also encompasses King’s childhood home as well as Ebenezer Baptist Church, where he famously served as pastor beginning 60 years ago. The neighborhood surrounding the park is the one that King grew up in and marks an important part of the story into his development.

Tony Rome, a marketing strategist for ecoATM, said the importance of the park was a key reason that his company made the donation.

”King was not only a giant in terms of his commitment to changing the world but also he had a commitment to people and to inspire change,” said Rome during the check presentation. ”We are here today to give back to those people.”

The importance of Atlanta, especially in the larger context of Black History Month, extends beyond King and his everlasting legacy. The city has been at the forefront of social justice and civil rights as well as being one of the most important hubs in Black entertainment. That’s why both ecoATM and the Martin Luther King Jr. were placing an emphasis on making a difference in the community. ecoATM, in particular, has made a number of its kiosks available in Atlanta at malls and grocery stores.

Rome said the company’s kiosks serve as more than simply a way to earn more money — they are also fundamentally important as they are in place to keep the environment healthy as humanly possible. 

“What we don’t want to have happen is have devices end up in the trash,” warned Rome. “There are hazardous materials in those devices that are bad for our environment”.

ecoATM Celebrates Black History Month with $10,000 Donation to Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Park

Pictured in front of Martin Luther King Jr.’s Atlanta birth home, from left: Judy Forte and Tony Rome | Source: Parker Owens for NewsOne


Instead of having used cell phones flooding the streets or being dumped in landfills the company’s goal is to be able to repair and fix the phones in order to reuse them, reducing the toxic waste that comes from these phones. This also helps the company offer phones and advanced technology to other people across the world in order to help them with obtaining the important devices that are becoming a staple in modern society.

As both the King National Park and ecoATM work on assisting the Atlanta community, both are also looking at the global impact and importance that they have on the environment and how to maintain a clean and sustainable planet.

”We try to envision Dr. King’s vision of a beloved community,” Forte added. ”We get to show how he was raised made him who he was.”

SEE ALSO:

The Evolution Of Teaching Black History To American Students

Understated Ways African Americans Can Make Black History

[ione_media_gallery src=”https://newsone.com” id=”3844698″ overlay=”true”]

Preserving Black History: Martin Luther King National Park Gets Major Donation To Protect The Environment

ecoATM Celebrates Black History Month with $10,000 Donation to Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Park

Source: Parker Owens for NewsOne / Parker Owens for NewsOne


ATLANTA — Martin Luther King Jr.’s rich legacy is commemorated in many ways, but the civil rights icon and his impact on American history often circle back to his efforts in creating a more just and equal society. That is part of the reason that Martin Luther King Jr. National Park was created in Atlanta nearly 30 years ago as a way to pay homage to him and to give back to the community where he was raised.

On Thursday, however, the park was the one on the receiving end thanks to a sizable donation. 

ecoATM, a reCommerce company for consumer electronics that encourages economic and financial flexibility by planting kiosks in various locations where people can exchange their old phones for money, presented Martin Luther King Jr. National Park with a check for $10,000 to help fund an existing initiative that seeks to educate young people about the importance of recycling — especially at the park itself.

”We were right in the midst of our discussion on how we were going to enhance our recycling program,” Judy Forte, who serves as the superintendent for the park said during the ceremony in the northeast section of Georgia’s capital city. ”We will be working with our local partners on how to connect with them to even do more.”

ecoATM Celebrates Black History Month with $10,000 Donation to Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Park

Pictured from left: Judy Forte, Superintendent of Martin Luther King Jr. National Park and Tony Rome, marketing strategist for ecoATM | Source: Parker Owens for NewsOne


The park lays in the center of what used to be the fourth ward of Atlanta and is of great importance to the community. It not only serves as a beacon for communal comradery but also encompasses King’s childhood home as well as Ebenezer Baptist Church, where he famously served as pastor beginning 60 years ago. The neighborhood surrounding the park is the one that King grew up in and marks an important part of the story into his development.

Tony Rome, a marketing strategist for ecoATM, said the importance of the park was a key reason that his company made the donation.

”King was not only a giant in terms of his commitment to changing the world but also he had a commitment to people and to inspire change,” said Rome during the check presentation. ”We are here today to give back to those people.”

The importance of Atlanta, especially in the larger context of Black History Month, extends beyond King and his everlasting legacy. The city has been at the forefront of social justice and civil rights as well as being one of the most important hubs in Black entertainment. That’s why both ecoATM and the Martin Luther King Jr. were placing an emphasis on making a difference in the community. ecoATM, in particular, has made a number of its kiosks available in Atlanta at malls and grocery stores.

Rome said the company’s kiosks serve as more than simply a way to earn more money — they are also fundamentally important as they are in place to keep the environment healthy as humanly possible. 

“What we don’t want to have happen is have devices end up in the trash,” warned Rome. “There are hazardous materials in those devices that are bad for our environment”.

ecoATM Celebrates Black History Month with $10,000 Donation to Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Park

Pictured in front of Martin Luther King Jr.’s Atlanta birth home, from left: Judy Forte and Tony Rome | Source: Parker Owens for NewsOne


Instead of having used cell phones flooding the streets or being dumped in landfills the company’s goal is to be able to repair and fix the phones in order to reuse them, reducing the toxic waste that comes from these phones. This also helps the company offer phones and advanced technology to other people across the world in order to help them with obtaining the important devices that are becoming a staple in modern society.

As both the King National Park and ecoATM work on assisting the Atlanta community, both are also looking at the global impact and importance that they have on the environment and how to maintain a clean and sustainable planet.

”We try to envision Dr. King’s vision of a beloved community,” Forte added. ”We get to show how he was raised made him who he was.”

SEE ALSO:

The Evolution Of Teaching Black History To American Students

Understated Ways African Americans Can Make Black History

[ione_media_gallery src=”https://newsone.com” id=”3844698″ overlay=”true”]

Black History Month HBCU Athlete Spotlight: Walter Payton

HBCU Black History Month

Source: iOne Creative Services / Urban One

Well, they call me Sweetness

And I like to dance

Runnin’ the ball is like makin’ romance

Those lyrics come from Walter “Sweetness” Payton famous verse from the Super Bowl Shuffle. Payton and the Chicago Bears went on to defeat the New England Patriots 46-10 in front of a capacity crowd at the New Orleans Superdome, but before he ran with the Bears, he was an alum of Jackson State University.

Payton originally committed to Kansas State University but ultimately decided to attend JSU and play for the Tigers where his older brother Eddie played. Payton rushed for more than 3,500 yards and set the school record for career rushing touchdowns with 65 during his time with the Tigers. Payton also won the coveted Black College Player of the Year twice.

In 1975, The Chicago Bears would pick Payton with the fourth pick of the NFL Draft and while he struggling his rookie season, the legend of Sweetness was on his way impact the Windy City in a way a black athlete had never done.

In 1976, his second season, Payton rushed for 1,390 yards and scored 13 touchdowns. Year three Payton won the Associated Press and Pro Football Writers of America’s Most Valuable Player awards. In a game versus the Minnesota Vikings, Payton rushed for 275 yards (With the Flu!), breaking the single-game record held by O.J. Simpson. Payton continued to put a pounding on the NFL and on October 7, 1984, he passed legendary running back Jim Brown to become the NFL’s all-time leading rusher. Then in 1985, Payton along with Jim McMahon and a defense led by fellow HBCU athlete Richard Dent (Tennessee State) lead the Bears to a 15-1 regular-season record and a victory over the Patriots in Super Bowl 20.

Payton’s career achievements after his career include: 

  • Super Bowl champion (XX)
  • 9× Pro Bowl (1976–1980, 1983–1986)
  • 7× First-team All-Pro (1976–1980, 1984, 1985)
  • Second-team All-Pro (1986)
  • AP NFL Most Valuable Player (1977)
  • Bert Bell Award (1985)
  • 2× NFC Offensive Player of the Year (1977, 1985)
  • NFL Offensive Player of the Year (1977)
  • NFL Man of the Year (1977)
  • Football Digest NFL Running Back of the Year (1977)
  • NFL rushing yards leader (1977)
  • NFL rushing touchdowns leader (1977)
  • 4× NFL rushing attempts leader (1976–1979)
  • First-team NFL 1970s All-Decade Team
  • First-team NFL 1980s All-Decade Team
  • NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team
  • NFL 100th Anniversary All-Time Team
  • Chicago Bears No. 34 retired

Also, the Man of the Year award, presented annually by the NFLhonoring a player’s volunteer and charity work, as well as his excellence on the field, was named in his honor.

In November of 1999, Payton passed away from a rare liver disease. His legacy lives on with his wife Connie, his children Jarrett and Brittney, grandchildren and a multitude of fans who still wear the number 34 on their backs to NFL games. Payton is one of the most beloved NFL players of all time: And an HBCU grad.

RELATED: Black History Month HBCU Athlete Spotlight: Doug Williams [Video]

RELATED: Black History Month HBCU Athlete Spotlight: Earl “The Pearl” Monroe [Video]

HBCU Spotlight: Bowie State University

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pg-cover9 02-03-06 Mark Gail_TWP #177091 The entrance to Bowie State University at Route 197 and Jer

Source: The Washington Post / Getty

Bowie State University

Bowie State University was founded in 1865, by the Baltimore Association for the Moral and Educational Improvement of Colored People as a teaching school. It is the oldest HBCU in Maryland and one of the ten oldest in the country. Bowie State University offers 22 undergraduate majors and 38 master’s, doctoral and advanced certification programs with a select focus on science, technology, business, education, and related disciplines. 

Mission Statement:

As Maryland’s first historically black public university, Bowie State University empowers a diverse population of students to reach their potential by providing innovative academic programs and transformational experiences as they prepare for careers, lifelong learning, and civic responsibility. Bowie State University supports Maryland’s workforce and economy by engaging in strategic partnerships, research, and public service to benefit our local, state, national, and global communities.

Notable Alumni: Toni Braxton and Wale.

Mascot: Bulldog

Enrollment: 6,171 students

learn more: https://bowiestate.edu/

The Evolution Of Teaching Black History To American Students

Teaching Black history to students has always been a part of the curriculum in American schools. The accuracy of it, however, and the necessary context for that type of instruction hasn’t always been there, to put it mildly.

In decades past, the type of Black history that was taught in American schools was mainly relegated to slavery and images of savage, impoverished Africans who should be grateful to their European captors for bringing them to a so-called civilized society. And then, as a special, yet very abbreviated treat, those same schools would “celebrate” Black History Month with the obligatory breakfast events that served stereotypically Black foods like grits and cornbread.

And that was mainly it, for the most part, when it came to teaching any elements of so-called Black history.

Fast forward to 2020 and things have changed drastically on the educational front when it comes to teaching children about true Black history — something that is no longer only restricted to the shortest month of the year.

One history professor at a historically Black college shed light on how important it is to educate children from an early age about Black history without diluting the truth.

“Especially in K through 12 education it’s important to provide doses of truth and allow the students to make their own discoveries,” Frederick Knight, a history professor at Morehouse College in Atlanta who specializes in the African diaspora, told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution recently. “That sets them up to be lifelong learners who cross-check facts and don’t accept everything at face value.”

The authors of a Black history textbook that offers a “gateway to connecting history to daily life” beyond February offered a similar sentiment to Knight.

Black History 365 (BH 365 )is an interactive U.S. history textbook that tells stories from the beginning in ancient Africa through modern events and moments. It documents unique narratives of Black people with lessons that come alive through more than 3,000 original artifacts, including resources and curriculum for teachers and sections for families and small groups. The textbook was published in advance of the current academic year.

The co-authors (Dr. Walter Milton Jr., a former school superintendent; Joel Freeman, a former NBA chaplain and founder of the Freeman Institute Black History Collection; and Heather R. Sanders, a former middle school educator and educational leader in Nashville) previously told NewsOne how important their textbook is.

“Black children have an education that’s void of anything that reminds them of their greatness and excellence in terms of achievement,” Milton said. “This textbook is for teachers and students in K-2, 3-5,6-8 and 9-12. It includes all of the components teachers need to be successful in delivering the information.”

Parents, teachers and school administrators are encouraged to visit the BH 365 website, BlackHistoryMatters.org, where they can find the answers to any questions about this revolutionary approach to teaching Black history.

SEE ALSO:

Black Buying Power By The Numbers: History In The Making

The History Of Black Nationalist Women And Political Activism

[ione_media_gallery src=”https://newsone.com” id=”3844698″ overlay=”true”]

The Came Before Tiger Woods: David Ross, Royal Golf Club

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For Black History Month, WOL News Talk 1450 AM, WYCB My Spirit 1340 and Praise 104.1 will be taking a look at golfers who came before Tiger Woods and the struggles to play the game in a segregated society. Today we take a look at the Royal Golf Club.

The Royals are brother organization to the Wake-Robin Golf Club. In 1938, both groups petitioned the federal government to desegregate public golf courses in Washington and was a major part of the movement of black golfers who pushed the PGA of America in 1961 to remove its white-only rule.

Former Club President David Ross talks about the Royals and the impact that the group had on golfing in the DMV area. Ross also talks about his own personal initiative and his goal of passing knowledge the game of golf to young people.

RELATED: They Came Before Tiger Woods: Mel Blackwell

RELATED: The Came Before Tiger Woods: Wake-Robin Golf Club, Inc

 

Black Buying Power By The Numbers: History In The Making

The wealth of Black people in America and the gap between other racial groups has been well documented, but that doesn’t mean Black folks don’t have any money to spend. Even though the racial wealth gap is actually widening, Black people can spend money with the best of them, statistics show.

MORE: How Closing The Racial Wealth Gap Would Change Black History

With Black History Month upon us, we take a closer look at the spending habits of Black America, by the numbers.

And with nearly 50 million Black people in the United States, Black consumers spend more than $1 trillion a year. Nielsen, which provides analytical insights about the habits of consumers, released an in-depth look at Black buying power to document the trends associated with that tremendously reliable level of spending.

“At 47.8 million strong and a buying power that’s on par with many countries’ gross domestic products, African Americans continue to outpace spending nationally,” said Cheryl Grace, Nielsen’s Senior Vice President of Community Alliances and Consumer Engagement and co-creator of the DIS Report. 

Nielsen’s report, entitled, “It’s in the Bag: Black Consumers’ Path to Purchase,” found that Black buyers have especially influenced the technology market and broke down the spending habits of Black consumers compared to the rest of the population at large.

The spending by Black consumers is especially influenced by advertising, the report found, with them being 42 percent more likely than the rest of the country to respond to ads on mobile. 

That’s because, the report found, that “Ninety-six percent of African Americans own a smartphone, and those aged 35+ surpass the total population in their age group by 2% for smartphone ownership. In fact, African Americans make up 23% of the total market for U.S. cellular sales, while only accounting for 14% of the overall population.”

Black folks also love to spend their money on beauty and grooming products, shelling out about $573.6 million on an annual basis for “personal soap and bath needs.” That was about 19 percent higher than any other demographic.

We also like to spend lavishly at high-end department stores, with 63 percent of Black folks saying in a survey they like to buy from Saks Fifth Avenue, 45 percent at Neiman Marcus (45%) and 24 percent at  Bloomingdales.

Also, counter to the current trend of shopping online, Black folks prefer to spend their money in person instead of over the internet. 

“More than half (52%) of African Americans find in-store shopping relaxing, compared with 26% of the total population” and “55% of Black consumers say they enjoy wandering the store looking for new, interesting products,” the Nielsen report found. “When shopping, African Americans are more influenced than the total population by store staff (34% more likely), in-store advertising (28% more likely) and merchandising (27% more likely).”

And when it comes to supporting our own, we are first in line to buy from Black-owned businesses, especially those in the beauty industry, where Black folks accounted “for almost 90% of the overall spend.”

We are also influenced by celebrities to the point that “35% of African American shoppers are more likely to agree, ‘when a celebrity designs a product, I am more likely to buy it.’”

Food is also another shopping sector that Black folks spend liberally on. According to Nielsen’s report, “soul food” is a major driver for “African American consumers’ top grocery purchases,” including certain brands like “Quaker grits ($19 million); Louisiana Fish Fry ($11 million); Glory Greens (frozen and fresh, $9.5 million combined) and Jay’s Potato Chips (nearly $2.7 million).”

But it’s not all selfish consumerism on the part of the Black dollar. A study from 2012 revealed that African Americans donate a larger share of their income to charities than any other group in the nation. 

“We have been givers since the beginning of time,” Tracey Webb, founder of Washington D.C-based Black Benefactors, previously told NewsOne. “From our communities in Africa to the Underground Railroad and the Civil Rights Movement, Black collective giving is something that’s inherent in us.”

With that said, Black Enterprise cautioned conflating buying habits with wealth. 

To the degree we withhold our spending from companies that are harmful, disrespectful, or unfair to black consumers, and intentionally direct our dollars toward companies (including black-owned businesses) that are beneficial to black communities and value black consumers, our spending power is important.,” Alfred Edmond Jr., Senior Vice President and Editor-at-large of Black Enterprise wrote in 2017.

“In other words,” he continued, “the ability to build wealth depends on the degree we control our spending, so that after we pay income and other taxes, and for necessities such as housing, food, and transportation, we have something left over to not just spend, but to earmark for emergency savings, retirement savings, an investment portfolio, buying real estate (beginning with our own homes), financing businesses, and acquiring other assets.”

SEE ALSO:

Turning African-American Buying Power Into Economic Power

Black Consumers: Paying More To Get Less

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This QUIZ Will Tell You How Black You Are

12 must-play party songs required dances

Source: Romario Lynch (@LeBossLynch) / Wade Haye

First, let me start off by saying, there isn’t just one way to be Black. Black comes in many different forms, lifestyles, shades and personalities.

But in the African American community, we often joke about someone not being Black enough or someone being too Black. And let’s not forget how tricky it can be for our biracial family and friends.

But for this particular quiz, we’re referring to the inside jokes we have within the culture. Cause let’s be honest, some ish is just for us. For us, By us.

So with that being said — how Black are you? Take this quiz to find out.

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I Love My HBCU: Choosing Howard University

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Attending a Historically Black College University can be the best experience that you create it to be. HBCUs are built on a foundation of culture. Listen to the stories of graduates that have amazing reasons why they are proud to be apart of the HBCU Family!

Jim wanted to go to another HBCU, but his family couldn’t afford it, he ended up at the University of Minnesota. Find out how his journey from the University of Minnesota to the motherland of Howard University learned the power of sales as a black professional. 

More notes about Howard University:

Famous Howard University Grads Include

  • Wendy Raquel Robinson
  • Chadwick Boseman
  • Anthony Anderson
  • Thurgood Marshall
  • Toni Morrison

Howard University Facts

  • Howard University, historically black university founded in 1867 in Washington, D.C., and named for General Oliver Otis Howard, head of the post-Civil War Freedmen’s Bureau, who influenced Congress to appropriate funds for the school. The university is financially supported in large part by the U.S. government but is privately controlled. (Per Britannica.com)
  • Howard is ranked as a Tier 1 national university by U.S. News & World Report (USNWR) as well as other higher education benchmarking entities.   Howard is ranked #124 among National Universities by USNWR.

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Black History Month HBCU Spotlight: Doug Williams [Video]

HBCU Black History Month

Source: iOne Creative Services / Urban One


On January 31st, 1988 Doug Williams made history. But before that historic day, Williams was already a history-maker.

One of the greatest HBCU athletes of all time, Doug Williams career started as a Freshman at Grambling State University under legendary head coach Eddie Robinson. Williams was a four-year starter for GSU, leading the Tigers to a 36-7 record, three Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) titles and was awarded the Black College Player of the Year twice.

1977 Williams finished fourth in the Heisman Trophy voting after a history-making season. Williams led the NCAA in passing yards and touchdowns. While this was the end of an amazing college career, this was just the beginning for Williams.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iduiH6Rhd14

On the advice of their offensive coordinator, Joe Gibbs, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers drafted Williams with the 17th pick in the first round of the 1978 NFL Draft. Williams became the first Black Quarterback taken in the first round. As the starter in 1979, Williams led the Bucs, who had won only 2 games in their first two seasons, to a 10-6 record and becoming the first Black quarterback to start in the league championship game, the NFC title game versus the Los Angeles Rams.

However, after a pay dispute, Williams headed to the newly formed USFL.

After the USFL folded in 1986, Williams returned to the NFL and signed with the Washington Redskins. The next year, after an injury to starter Jay Schroder, Williams took over the job defeating Chicago Bears and Minnesota Vikings on the road to Super Bowl 22 against highly touted Quarterback John Elway and the Denver Broncos.

The Broncos, making a repeat appearance in the title game was favored to win the Super Bowl mainly because of Elway. In fact, the game started out well for the Broncos and an injury forced Williams out of the game in the first quarter. Down 10-0 at the beginning of the 2nd quarter, Williams and the Redskins put on a show for the ages. Williams completed 9 of 11 passes for 228 yards and the Skins scored 35 points, leading the way to a 42-10 win At Super Bowl XXII in San Diego.

Williams finished the game throwing 18/29 for 340 yards passing and four touchdowns, named MVP and becoming the first Black quarterback to win a Super Bowl.

Since his retirement, Williams has gone back to his HBCU roots on many occasions. In 1997, Williams was the head coach of Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia before returning to his Alma Mater Grambling State,  succeeding his former head coach Eddie Robinson from 1998 until 2013 then returning from 2011 to 2013. William has been a scout and executive, currently serving as the Senior vice president of player development for the Washington Redskins. His career highlights include:

80 Greatest Redskins

Washington Redskins Ring of Fame

Tampa Stadium Krewe of Honor

Tampa Bay Buccaneers Ring of Honor

College Football Hall of Fame inductee (2001)

RELATED: Black History Month HBCU Spotlight: Earl “The Pearl” Monroe [Video]